Skip links and keyboard navigation

Dengue fever update: Rockhampton

Update 16 August 2019

There have been no more recent confirmed cases of dengue fever from the recent Rockhampton outbreak. The total number of confirmed cases remains at 13.

Central Queensland Public Health Unit and Rockhampton Regional Council are continuing to work together on mosquito control measures to minimise the spread of the outbreak.

It is especially important during rain that residents remove all containers or objects that can hold water to remove breeding areas for aedes aegypti (dengue-transmitting) mosquitoes.  All plastic pots, tyres, palm fronds etc should be cleared of yards, and permanent fixtures such as bird baths should be emptied and scrubbed to remove eggs.

Update 5 July 2019

There are now 13 confirmed cases of dengue fever from the recent Rockhampton outbreak.

All cases are physically well, and all have strong connections with Park Avenue and Kawana.

Central Queensland Public Health Unit and Rockhampton Regional Council are continuing to work together on mosquito control measures to minimise the spread of the outbreak.

It is especially important during rain that residents remove all containers or objects that can hold water to remove breeding areas for aedes aegypti (dengue-transmitting) mosquitoes.  All plastic pots, tyres, palm fronds etc should be cleared of yards, and permanent fixtures such as bird baths should be emptied and scrubbed to remove eggs.

Update 28 June 2019

There are now seven confirmed cases of dengue fever from the recent Rockhampton outbreak.

All cases are physically well, and all have strong connections with the same area.

Central Queensland Public Health Unit and Rockhampton Regional Council are working together on mosquito control measures to minimise the spread of the outbreak.

Recent rain could trigger mosquito breeding in containers that hold water. Residents can play their part by eradicating breeding conditions of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by keeping yards free of such containers (e.g. plastic pots, tyres, palm fronds etc.).

Update 17 June 2019

Central Queensland Public Health Unit has confirmed six cases of dengue fever in the recent Rockhampton outbreak. There are four other probable cases.

All of the cases are physically well, and all have strong links to Park Avenue.

The messages remain the same. There is no need to panic, but residents can play their part in eradicating the breeding conditions of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by keeping their yards free of containers that can hold water (e.g. plastic pots, tyres, palm fronds etc).

Central Queensland Public Health Unit and Rockhampton Regional Council are still working together on mosquito control measures to minimise the spread of the outbreak.

More than 600 properties have been inspected and sprayed. Aedes aegypti (dengue-transmitting) mosquitoes have been found at a significant number of those properties.

Update 12 June 2019

Central Queensland Public Health Unit has clarified the number of dengue fever cases identified in Rockhampton recently to three confirmed and five probable cases.

National reporting standards require two consecutive positive test results 10-14 days apart to be confirmed, and some probable cases may never be confirmed.

We continue to investigate suspected cases and will update the public if further cases are confirmed.

It is very important that the public gets the right information from a reliable source. Dengue numbers are available at: https://www.health.qld.gov.au/clinical-practice/guidelines-procedures/diseases-infection/diseases/mosquito-borne/dengue/dengue-outbreaks1

Central Queensland Public Health Unit and Rockhampton Regional Council have worked well together over the past few weeks to take mosquito control measures to minimise the spread of the outbreak.

More than 580 properties have been inspected and sprayed. Aedes aegypti (dengue-transmitting) mosquitoes have been found at 47 of those properties.

Home owners right across Rockhampton can play their part by keeping their yards free of stagnant water to stop mosquitoes from breeding.

Avoid being bitten by mosquitoes by using repellents, mosquito coils (in ventilated areas) and plug-in repellent devices. Wear long-sleeved clothes and cover your feet.

Dengue mosquitoes live and breed around domestic premises and bite during the day.

Symptoms of dengue fever include sudden onset of fever, extreme tiredness, intense headache, muscle and joint pain, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, rash, minor bleeding from the nose or gums and/or heavy menstrual periods. They can range from mild to severe.

Anyone with these symptoms should see their GP to discuss the need for a dengue fever test.

Update 24 May 2019

Queensland Health has been notified of the first locally acquired case of dengue fever in Rockhampton in decades.

A full outbreak response is being enacted by the Central Queensland Public Health Unit, in partnership with Rockhampton Regional Council.

The individual has no history of overseas travel or travel to North Queensland, where dengue outbreaks are known to occur.

It is known that Aedes aegypti, a mosquito capable of transmitting dengue, is present in some areas of Rockhampton however as mosquito numbers are small and located in areas with low population density, locally acquired cases do not usually occur.

Rockhampton Regional Council and Central Queensland Public Health Unit will doorknock residents near the individual’s home from today.

Queensland Health has comprehensive dengue management plans to manage cases and outbreaks of dengue.

Typical symptoms of dengue fever can include sudden onset of fever, extreme tiredness, intense headache, muscle and joint pain, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, rash, minor bleeding from the nose or gums and/or heavy menstrual periods.

Symptoms can range from mild to severe.

Anyone with these symptoms should see their GP immediately to discuss the need for a dengue fever test.

The dengue virus does not spread directly from person to person.

The best protection against mosquito-borne diseases, such as dengue, is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

There are a number of methods in which resident can protect themselves including using mosquito coils or plug-in mosquito repellent devices inside. Screen living and sleeping areas. Wear long-sleeved, light-coloured clothing, and cover your feet. Use insect repellent containing DEET (diethyl toluamide) or picaridin and reapply according to the label.

The mosquito that transmits dengue lives and breeds around domestic premises and bites during the day.

More information on dengue fever is available on the Queensland Health website1 or by calling 13 HEALTH (13 43 25 84).

Last updated: 20 August 2019

CQ Health media enquiries

Media Manager (Central Queensland)
Phone (07) 4920 6711

Connect with us

Join us on social media as we create a more connected health community.

facebook linked in The YouTube icon The icon of Instagram