Skip links and keyboard navigation

Common myths about mozzies

Tuesday 5 December 2017

A close up of a mosquito biting someone's skin.
Separating the mozzie myths from the facts can help you prevent getting bitten.

Do you know your mosquito fact from fiction? We've debunked some common mozzie myths, find out if you know the truth.

Bananas and beer will protect you from mosquito bites

False – you can’t eat or drink anything that makes you get bitten less. Bananas, vegemite and beer are commonly believed to make you naturally repel mozzies, but there is no scientific evidence to support this.

Drinking alcohol can mean you get bitten more

True – drinking alcohol might increase your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes. This might be because drinking alcohol raises your skin temperature, or because drinkers forget to reapply repellent.

Vitamin B repels mosquitoes

False – it’s yet to be scientifically proven that taking vitamin B supplements will guard you from mosquitoes or make you react less severely to their bites. Always check with your doctor before adding supplements or vitamins to your daily regimen.

Mosquitoes love pregnant women

True – pregnant women might be more likely to get bitten by mosquitoes. This is because of their raised body temperature.

Mosquitoes can give you AIDS

False – mosquitoes cannot transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, between humans. The diseases mosquitoes do spread include Dengue fever, Ross River virus and Zika virus. A full list of mosquito borne diseases that Queensland has an established surveillance system for can be found here.

Working up a sweat works up mozzies' appetites

True – exercise can make you more attractive to mosquitoes. Anything that raises your body temperature or causes sweating can increase your risk of being bitten.

Want to know more about how to protect yourself from mosquitoes? Read our blog about how to use mosquito repellent correctly.

Last updated: 11 December 2017