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Satellite Hospitals Program frequently asked questions

The Satellite Hospitals Program aims to deliver seven new healthcare facilities in South East Queensland to supplement existing healthcare in the area.

About the Satellite Hospitals Program

What is the Satellite Hospitals Program?

The Satellite Hospital Program (SHP) is a $280 million Queensland Government commitment to deliver seven new facilities to support public healthcare delivery in rapidly growing communities across South-East Queensland.

Each facility will provide healthcare services that are more appropriately delivered in the community, closer to home and in a more convenient setting.

These facilities will support emergency departments at major hospitals by giving people the option to access healthcare for minor injuries and illnesses within their local community.

Services delivered at each facility will be informed by the needs of the local community and may include simple day therapy services such as chemotherapy, complex wound management, renal dialysis, to more specific care for minor injuries or illnesses. They may also incorporate outpatient or community-based health services with virtual healthcare opportunities.

Suitable locations for each site are currently being investigated. The proposed regions for these facilities include Bribie Island, Brisbane Northside, Brisbane Southside, Caboolture, Gold Coast, Ipswich and Redlands.

Consultation and planning for each facility, including the services to be provided, is currently underway.

About proposed locations and sites

What are the proposed regions for the satellite hospitals?

The proposed locations for these facilities include:

  • Bribie Island
  • Brisbane Northside
  • Brisbane Southside
  • Caboolture
  • Gold Coast
  • Ipswich
  • Redland.

How were the regions identified as needing one of these healthcare facilities?

The purpose of these proposed healthcare facilities is to give patients better access to healthcare services for simple day-therapy services such as complex wound management or care for minor injuries and illnesses, freeing up capacity in major emergency departments.

Will other regions be considered for a facility in the future?

While there is no current plan to extend the Satellite Hospital Program beyond these seven facilities, there may be a future decision made to do so.

How were the proposed sites identified within each region?

The Queensland Government underwent an extensive site identification process to determine the most suitable, fit-for-purpose site within each identified region.

Factors considered as part of the site identification process included:

  • size, suitability for built infrastructure and potential environmental issues
  • locality to relevant rapidly growing communities
  • community need
  • planning or zoning restrictions/considerations
  • budget implications.

Why was my region not considered for a healthcare facility?

While there is no current plan to extend the Satellite Hospital Program beyond these seven facilities, there may be a future decision made to do so.

Are there concept designs for the facilities?

The facilities will feature a modular design and will provide services that meet the local community need.

Concept designs for the sites are being released as they become available. Please refer to the individual sites on the Proposed Satellite Hospitals locations page.

The concept designs are subject to change and are indicative images only.

About the facilities and provision of services

What is the purpose of these healthcare facilities?

These purpose-built healthcare facilities will provide urgent healthcare services closer to home, within rapidly growing communities.

The objective of these facilities is to support existing hospital emergency departments and service providers, by providing a range of outpatient community-based health services with virtual healthcare opportunities.

What services will each facility provide?

Each healthcare facility will deliver a range of services depending on the needs of the local community. The facility will incorporate outpatient community-based health services with virtual healthcare opportunities to service the local community.

Services offered will differ across each site and could include simple day therapy services such as chemotherapy, complex wound management, renal dialysis, and care for minor injuries or illnesses.

Consultation and planning around services to be provided is currently underway with the relevant Hospital and Health Services.

How can I get a job within one of these facilities?

Planning around services to be provided at each facility is currently underway, as are the investigations into suitable sites for the facility.

In terms of employment opportunities available in the future, please liaise with the relevant Hospital and Health Service (HHS) in your preferred area.

  • Metro North HHS: Caboolture, Pine Rivers (Kallangur) and Bribie Island
  • Metro South HHS: Redland and Brisbane South (Eight Mile Plains)
  • Gold Coast HHS: Tugun
  • West Moreton HHS: Ripley

About the planning process – Ministerial Infrastructure Designation (MID) process

What is the Ministerial Infrastructure Designation process?

A Ministerial Infrastructure Designation (MID) process is an alternative development assessment process for the delivery of community infrastructure and services such as schools, hospitals and healthcare services.

The MID process considers all potential impacts that may arise on a project, such as traffic and impacts on amenity.

The Deputy Premier and Minister for State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning is the decision maker for a MID and this assessment process is coordinated by the Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning (DSDILGP).

Once the appropriate sites are identified and acquired, a MID will be sought for each facility.

Why does this project need to go through a MID process?

As a ‘Satellite Hospital’ is a type of infrastructure that can be designated, each site will undergo a Ministerial Infrastructure Designation (MID) process to ensure the projects meets all necessary planning requirements to enable development to occur.

How can I contribute feedback about the location of the facility?

Community engagement will be undertaken as part of the Ministerial Infrastructure Designation process for each site.

Two phases of community engagement will be undertaken for each site:

  • Phase one: preliminary engagement (for 10-15 days) with targeted key stakeholder groups.
  • Phase two: formal public notification and engagement (for 20 days) with the broader community and interested stakeholder groups.
  • Feedback from both consultation phases will inform the MID lodged with the Minister for Planning.
  • For community engagement updates, visit the Satellite Hospitals public consultation page.

What are the timeframes for engagement around the MID?

It is expected that formal public notification and engagement will be undertaken for each site between September and December 2021.

Interested parties are encouraged to have their say. Opportunities to provide feedback will be made available online at Satellite Hospitals Program.

Further to this, your contact details can be placed on a mailing list, to be advised of engagement opportunities relating to the project site you are most interested in. To be included on the mailing list, please email SHP_engagement@health.qld.gov.au along with your postal address, preferred contact number, email address and key points of interest about the proposed site you are interested in.

For more information email the Satellite Hospitals Program team at SHP_engagement@health.qld.gov.au.

Last updated: 17 August 2022