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About refugee populations

about refugee populations

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  Cultural profiles
  Refugee communities
  Refugee Health Queensland

Refugees are people who have fled their country of residence due to a well-founded fear of persecution based on race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion.

The most commonly accepted definition of a refugee is set out in the United Nations 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees (as broadened by the 1967 Protocol). Under the convention, the term "refugee" applies to any person who:

owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it.

Australia was the sixth country to ratify the convention and ratified the 1967 Protocol in 1973. This means that the convention and its definitions are reflected in Australian law.

Refugees in Queensland

The Commonwealth Department of Immigration and Citizenship coordinates the settlement of refugees in Australia.

In 2010-2011, refugees settling in Queensland came from more than 35 different countries and arrived under many different conditions. The five most common countries of origin were Afghanistan, Bhutan, Congo, Iran and Myanmar, which accounted for more than 65 per cent of all people granted refugee status in Australia.

Refugees have been settled throughout Queensland, including in Brisbane, Cairns, Logan, Toowoomba and Townsville.


Last updated: 8 October 2013

What's new?

Queensland Health Guideline for multicultural policy implementation
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Health Care Providers' Handbook on Sikh Patients
Aquick-reference tool for health workers to use when caring for Sikh patients. The handbook aims to help health workers understand the religious beliefs and practices of Sikhs that can affect health care.

Health Care Providers' Handbook on Hindu Patients
A quick-reference tool for health workers to use when caring for Hindu patients. The handbook aims to help health workers understand the religious beliefs and practices of Hindus that can affect health care.

Community profiles for health care providers
A series of 18 cultural profiles that aim to assist health care providers to better understand the health beliefs, pre-migration experiences, communication preferences and other aspects of their clients' culture.

Death and hospitalisation rates by country of birth in Queensland
A series of reports which provides an analysis of deaths and hospitalisation rates among Queenslanders based on country of birth.

Cross Cultural Learning and Development Calendar 2012
A calendar which contains the dates for all Queensland Health cross cultural learning and development training courses for 2012.


Complaints about health or other services

Do you have concerns about a government or non-government health service or are you unhappy with the way an issue has been handled? Do you think you have been treated unfairly or are you concerned about a decision or action of a health professional?

It is ok to complain, and there are organisations that are independent of the government that can help you, free of charge.

Go to the Queensland Independent Complaint Agencies' website for more information.