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Celebrating Mother’s Day during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Wednesday 6 May 2020

A older couple stand at their front door, waving to someone in a car.
You can still celebrate Mother's Day this year, it might just need to be a little different to normal.

This article was written during the Queensland response to the COVID-19 pandemic and reflects the information available at the date of publication. Please check the Queensland Government COVID-19 webpage for updated information and current health advice regarding COVID-19 in Queensland.

We love our mums. While we think Queenslanders should celebrate their mums every single day, Mother’s Day gives us the chance to really show mums our appreciation. This includes the soon-to-be mums, the fur-mums, the mums we’ve lost along the way and all the people who have stood in as mums when we’ve needed them.

This Mother’s Day will be different.

Queenslanders are doing a great job of listening to and following the rules during our response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. This has helped us to flatten the curve and slow the spread of COVID-19 in our state.

Because of this, we’ve been able to slightly ease some of the restrictions. But we need to make sure we don’t undo our great work. We all, mums included, need to continue social distancing measures, this weekend. This means staying at home as much as possible, limiting contact with people you don’t live with, and keeping a distance of 1.5 metres – that’s two big steps – between yourself and others.

Even though we need to keep up these measures, we still want you to be able to show your mums how much they really mean to you.

Below, we’ve got some tips to help you celebrate Mother’s Day safely this year, and some answers to questions you might have about what you can and can’t do this Mother’s Day in Queensland.

Celebrating Mother’s Day during a pandemic

If you don’t live with her, you might have to change how you would normally celebrate Mother’s Day this year. Here are some ideas for how you can celebrate this Mother’s Day:

  • Organise a delivery of flowers or a special gift for your mum.
  • Host a virtual brunch with your extended family – you can even pre-cook and deliver a meal to your mum if she lives within 50 kilometres of your home.
  • Handmake gifts and cards – school craft stall style – and send these to your mum, grandma, and other mother figures in your life.
  • Make a special visit to a mum or drop off a card to a grandma in your street or neighbourhood whose families aren’t able to visit on the day.
  • Spend some quality one-on-one time with your mum – take her on a personalised picnic or walk in a nearby National Park, two activities you are allowed to do together while keeping a safe distance.
  • Host your mum at your house – why not cook her a special meal or put on a family show for her with your kids. From Sunday 10 May, households can have two visitors from the same or different households, or up to five visitors from the same household, regardless of how many people live there.
  • Make a home video with the people you live with to share with your mum on the day.
  • Catalogue your siblings’ favourite homecooked meals and get your mum to teach you how to make them during a family video chat.
  • Call your mum or grandma and ask them to tell you a story about how they celebrated Mother’s Day when they were your age.
  • Support local businesses by buying your mum a voucher to spend later or online now.
  • Remember to check in on friends or other family members who may have recently lost their mum or grandma – Mother’s Day can be a hard time for some people.

A family with mum, dad and two little girls have a picnic.

Questions about celebrating Mother’s Day in Queensland this year

Not sure what you can and can’t do this Mother’s Day, or how to do it safely? We’ve answered some of the top questions below.

Can I visit my mum at her home?

You are allowed to leave your house to visit someone else at their house. From Sunday 10 May, households can have two visitors from the same or different households, or up to five visitors from the same household, regardless of how many people live there.

Even though you’re allowed to visit other people, you should still think about celebrating and marking special occasions like Mother’s Day in different ways. This will help protect both yourself and your loved ones from possibility catching or spreading the virus.

While visiting others, staying 1.5 metres away from them – think two big steps. While Mother’s Day is usually a time full of affection, try not to hug, kiss or shake hands with others right now.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Can I visit my mum or grandma who live more than 50 kilometres away?

You might be wondering, 'I live in Brisbane and my mum lives on the Sunshine Coast – can I visit her for Mother’s Day?'

The answer is yes, you can visit another household with no restriction on distance, but you can't go out into that community - you must go straight there and stay there. You can’t all go to the park or the beach together. You can't stay overnight.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Can I organise a family gathering outside of my home, in a park or another public space (other than my home)?

You can visit a park or another public space if you are with the people you live with, or if you are by yourself, with one other person.

If you are with the people you live with, there are no restrictions on the number of people you can be with. For example, if you live with your mum, you can organise a gathering outside of your home (within a 50 kilometres radius) for yourself, your mum, and other people that live in your house.

Can I visit my grandmother at her home?

Older Queenslanders and people with compromised immune systems are at greatest risk of getting really sick from COVID-19. This means they should stay at home as much as possible and limit contact with other people.

From Sunday 10 May, households can have two visitors from the same or different households, or up to five visitors from the same household, regardless of how many people live there.

Remember that we need to protect both yourself and your loved ones – especially the vulnerable groups – from possibility catching or spreading the virus.

If you visit your grandma remember to stay 1.5 metres away from her – think two big steps. While Mother’s Day is usually a time full of affection, try not to hug, kiss or shake hands with others right now.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Think about doing it differently this Mother’s Day to protect those who are more vulnerable to the virus by organising a phone or video chat, where you can then talk for as long as you like!

Can I visit my mum or grandma if she lives in an aged care facility?

Yes, but the visit needs to be no longer than two hours and once per day. But you won’t be able to visit an aged care facility if you:

  • have returned from overseas in the last 14 days
  • have had contact with a person with COVID-19 in the last 14 days
  • have visited a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days
  • have a fever (37.5 degrees or more)
  • have a cough, runny nose, sore throat or breathing difficulties
  • after 1 May 2020, have not had the 2020 flu vaccination (unless it is unavailable to you, for example, you are allergic to the vaccine)
  • are under 16 years of age, unless you’re visiting a resident to provide end of life support

While visiting others, staying 1.5 metres away from them – think two big steps. While Mother’s Day is usually a time full of affection, try not to hug, kiss or shake hands with others right now.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Can I visit my mum or grandma if she is in hospital?

Yes. You can visit a patient in hospital but there are some restrictions, which will change depending on what area of the hospital the person is in. Remember to check visitor conditions with the facility before visiting.

You won’t be able to visit a patient in hospital if you:

  • have been asked to self-quarantine due to travel overseas or interstate
  • have been diagnosed with coronavirus (COVID-19) and are self-isolating
  • have had close contact with a person who has novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in the previous 14 days
  • are unwell, particularly with a fever, cough, sore throat and shortness of breath
  • are under the age of 16.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Can five family members who live in different houses all visit their mum?

No. Only one household with a maximum of five people can visit another household.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

Can I hug or kiss my mum?

Only if you live in the same house with her. We know it's really tough, but limiting contact with other people is one of the best ways to slow the spread of COVID-19. Always practice social distancing, even when you're visiting another household.

If you're sick, stay home. If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, go and get tested.

More information

This situation is still developing, and as things change, our advice and restrictions will, too. To keep up-to-date with information about what you should and shouldn’t do during this time, visit our website or Facebook page.

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Last updated: 6 May 2020