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Specific radiation source plan requirements

Develop a Radiation Safety and Protection Plan details the standard information to include in a Plan.

Additional Plan management information is needed for some radiation sources and practices. You only need to detail this additional management information if it applies to your specific radiation source and practice type.

When your Plan is complete to your satisfaction you can submit your application for a Possession Licence. Your Plan needs to be approved before you can be granted a Possession Licence.

Industries with specific radiation management requirements include:

  • medical
  • dental
  • chiropractic radiography
  • veterinary
  • industrial radiography
  • borehole logging
  • education, science and research
  • compliance testing, servicing or calibration.

Record diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in a register

Radiation businesses must maintain a register of procedures if they are performing:

  • diagnostic procedures
  • therapeutic procedures.

You should provide a template procedure register and require your Use Licensees to record:

  • the date of the procedure
  • details of the procedure, including the staff involved in performing the procedure
  • details of any radioactive substance injected, administered, or implanted in the patient
  • details of the equipment used, its setting and other operating procedures.

Procedures for producing images

Radiation businesses that produce images need to detail the:

  • way images are to be recorded, how they will be stored and for how long
  • methods and procedures for using imaging equipment
  • information to be included on the image
  • ancillary equipment to be used.

Who needs this information?

This information relates to businesses that provide:

  • diagnostic images
  • therapeutic procedures
  • nuclear medicine.

Procedures for using imaging equipment

Detail any special procedures all individuals are expected to follow to ensure the correct and safe operation of your business and the ancillary imaging equipment.

The information should include:

  • techniques for conventional film processing, if relevant
  • how to get the optimal use of computed/digital imaging systems
  • conditions to allow the discharge of a patient from the hospital or clinic (for procedures using radioactive substances)
  • conditions to allow the treatment of an outpatient (for procedures using radioactive substances).

The Recommendations for the discharge of patients undergoing treatment with radioactive substances (2002) provides guidance for radiation practices to develop their procedure to discharge patients being treated with radioactive substances.

Information to include on a radiograph

Radiographs with a surface area of 45cm2 or more, and nuclear medicine images

Information to include on the radiograph:

  • the name of the Use Licensee
  • the name of the Possession Licensee
  • the address of the premises where the radiograph was produced
  • the name, gender and date of birth of the treated person
  • the date the radiograph was produced
  • information to enable the correct interpretation of the radiograph
  • details of the radiopharmaceuticals administered to, or injected into, the treated person (nuclear medicine only).

Radiographs with a surface area of less than 45cm2

These radiographs need to include enough information to identify the treated person. As these radiographs are a smaller size, they do not need to include the same level of detail that larger radiographs require.

Digital images

Digital images must record all of the above information in a way that is uniquely linked to each image.

Personal alarm dosemeters provided for ionising radiation practices

Your Plan must provide advice on any requirement for wearing personal alarm dosemeters in your business. If personal alarm dosemeters are not required for the practice, then the plan needs to state this, and why.

Personal alarm dosemeter: a device that produces a visual or audible signal when a radiation dose received by the device is higher than a set level. These devices provide an immediate visual or audible signal to users about the radiation levels in an area.

Who needs this information?

Radiation businesses that use ionising radiation sources may need to provide personal alarm dosemeters to the people who will be using the radiation sources to warn them if they are in very high radiation fields.

Areas that commonly use ionising radiation sources include:

  • medical
  • dental
  • chiropractic radiography
  • veterinary
  • industrial gauging
  • industrial radiography
  • borehole logging
  • education, science and research
  • compliance testing, servicing or calibration.

Plan details

If personal alarm dosemeters are required for the business, your Plan must include details of:

  • the staff required to use the equipment
  • how and when the equipment is to be used
  • the sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response of the radiation source
  • when compliance testing and maintenance will occur on the equipment (intervals need to be less than 12 months)
  • a requirement that repaired equipment, or potentially damaged equipment, must not be used unless it is first checked for sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response
  • what qualifications or abilities the service provider needs to have to check the sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response of the equipment.

These periodic checks of the personal alarm dosemeters must involve the use of a radiation source to check the response of the equipment to radiation (no simulation).

Radiation monitoring equipment provided for ionising radiation practices

Plans for radiation businesses that use ionising radiation sources must detail the radiation monitoring equipment that will be used.

Monitoring equipment: monitors the radiation emitted from radioactive substances or ionising radiation equipment over a period of time.

Who needs this information?

Fields that commonly need this equipment include:

  • radiotherapy
  • nuclear medicine
  • industrial radiography
  • borehole logging
  • education, science and research
  • compliance testing, servicing or calibration.

These devices are not typically required for:

  • diagnostic procedures on people
  • chemical analysis
  • cabinet radiation equipment
  • enclosed radiation equipment.

Plan details

Detail the radiation monitoring equipment that will be used in your radiation business.

You will need to include details of:

  • how the equipment is to be used
  • the sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response of the radiation monitoring equipment
  • when compliance testing and maintenance will occur on the equipment (intervals need to be less than 12 months)
  • a requirement that repaired equipment, or potentially damaged equipment, must not be used unless it is first checked for sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response
  • what qualifications or abilities the service provider needs to have to check the sensitivity, accuracy, range and energy response of the equipment.

These assessments should to involve the use of a radiation source to check the response of the equipment to radiation.

If this equipment is unnecessary in your business the plan should state that the devices are not provided and detail the reasons behind this decision.

Businesses using laser equipment

Plans for radiation businesses that use laser equipment must include the following requirements for staff to:

  • wear PPE that meets the relevant standards
  • ensure no specularly reflecting surfaces are present where lasers are used
  • ensure no flammable materials are in the vicinity
  • ensure a medical check has been conducted prior to undertaking a cosmetic service.
Last updated: 4 December 2020