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Immunisation Schedule Queensland

The Immunisation Schedule Queensland – July 2018, contains the recommended National Immunisation Program (NIP) vaccines and state-funded vaccines for those people who are eligible. In addition, the Queensland Department of Health provides vaccine for other disease prevention programs. From 1 July 2018, some schedule changes have been implemented.

The Immunisation Schedule Queensland – July 2018, includes individual schedules for:

Additional vaccines are funded for medically at-risk individuals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

In Queensland, all children from 6 months to <5 years of age are eligible for a funded influenza vaccination. Check the current guidelines for influenza vaccination.

Different brands of the same vaccines will be used in the schedule. All vaccinations should be given on time as scheduled.

Immunisation providers should actively review a patient’s vaccination history on the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) and ensure vaccinations are recorded on AIR after administration.

Summary of schedule changes commencing 1 July 2018:

1. Routine infant pneumococcal vaccination (Prevenar 13 - 13vPCV) will be given at 2, 4 and 12 months of age instead of at 2, 4 and 6 months.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and medically at-risk children will receive Prevenar 13 at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age.

  • From 1 July 2018, all children presenting for their 12 month vaccinations should receive a funded dose of Prevenar 13, along with their other 12 month vaccinations.

2. Catch-up recommendations for children who present without having completed the age-appropriate course of Prevenar 13 are provided in the updated online Australian Immunisation Handbook. Nimenrix (meningococcal ACWY vaccine) will be given at 12 months of age replacing Menitorix — the current combination meningococcal C-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine.

  • From 1 July 2018, all children presenting for their 12 month vaccinations should receive a funded dose of Nimenrix, along with their other 12 month vaccinations.
  • No funded catch-up for Nimenrix is provided through the NIP for children who have already received Menitorix.

3. Because Nimenrix replaces Menitorix, a child’s fourth and final Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination will be provided as a monovalent vaccine at 18 months of age.

  • Four doses of Hib will continue to be provided through the NIP. From 1 July 2018, infants will continue to receive Hib at 2, 4, and 6 months of age (in the Infanrix Hexa vaccine). The fourth dose will be given as monovalent Hib at 18 months of age.

Additional vaccines for medically at-risk individuals

Age

Diseases

Vaccine

2, 4, 6 and 12 months

Pneumococcal disease

*Prevenar 13®

12 months (children born at <32 weeks gestation and/or <2000g birth weight.)

Hepatitis B

Engerix B® OR HBVaxII® paediatric

4 years (medically at risk including premature infants born <28 weeks gestation)

Pneumococcal disease

*Pneumovax 23®

Any age group (adults with medical risk factors)

Pneumococcal disease

*Pneumovax 23®

*Refer to conditions associated with an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the online Australian Immunisation Handbook

Additional vaccine for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 6 months to less than 5 years of age are eligible to receive influenza vaccine annually.

Age

Diseases

Vaccine

2, 4, 6 and 12 months

Pneumococcal disease

*Prevenar 13

12 months

Hepatitis A

Vaqta Paediatric®

18 months

Hepatitis A

Pneumococcal disease

Vaqta Paediatric®

*Prevenar 13®

Adults (15 to 50 years and over)

Influenza

Pneumococcal disease

Influenza

*Pneumovax 23®

*Refer to conditions associated with an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the online Australian Immunisation Handbook

Catch-up vaccines for all children and adolescents up to 19 years

Catch-up immunisations aim to provide optimal protection against disease as quickly as possible by completing the vaccinations recommended for a person.

Immunisation providers should actively review a patient’s vaccination history on the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) and give the appropriate catch-up vaccines. An appropriate catch-up schedule cannot be administered without first checking the vaccination history.

If a person has not received all the vaccines in the Immunisation Schedule Queensland appropriate for their age, plan and document a catch-up schedule.

Annual influenza program

Queensland Health coordinates the National Influenza Immunisation Program for eligible groups across the state. See the Australian Government Department of Health Immunise Australia Program for more information.

Whooping cough and influenza vaccination for pregnant women

Whooping cough vaccination for pregnant women is offered as part of the National Immunisation Program. Vaccination is recommended with each pregnancy to provide maximum protection for newborn babies. This includes pregnancies which are close together (e.g. less than 2 years).

The Australian Immunisation Handbook recommends vaccination of pregnant women early in the third trimester (between 28 and 32 weeks).

Pregnant women should also ensure they are vaccinated for influenza, which can be given at the same time as the whooping cough vaccine. For the best protection against the flu, women should be vaccinated as soon as possible in the flu season, regardless of the trimester they are in. However, they must wait for their third trimester to receive the whooping cough vaccine.

National Shingles Vaccination Program

The National Shingles Vaccination Program commenced in November 2016 for adults 70 years of age, with a single catch-up dose funded for adults aged 71 to 79 years until 2021.

Meningococcal ACWY Vaccination Program

The Queensland government offers free meningococcal ACWY vaccination to all:

  • Year 10 students through the School Immunisation Program
  • Young adults aged between 15 to 19 years who can access the vaccine through their doctor or immunisation provider from June 2017 until 31 December 2018.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B vaccination is funded for:

  • low-birth weight preterm newborn infants (<2000g) and/or infants born at <32 weeks gestation (irrespective of weight), who should also receive a booster of a hepatitis B-containing vaccine at 12 months of age
  • household or other close (household-like) contacts of people with hepatitis B
  • sexual contacts of people with hepatitis B
  • migrants (who have a Medicare card) from hepatitis B endemic countries (if non-immune/not previously vaccinated)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (if non-immune/not previously vaccinated)
  • people with chronic liver disease and/or hepatitis C
  • people who inject drugs.

Hepatitis B vaccine is recommended (but not funded) for other individuals who may be at risk of hepatitis B. Refer to the online Australian Immunisation Handbook for further details.

Immunisation

Last updated: 11 July 2018