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Superseded - Hospital Entry Direction (No. 7)

This direction has been superseded on 15 January 2022. See the current Hospital Visitor Entry Direction (No. 2).

Summary

Effective from: 1.00am AEST 13 December 2021

Posted: 11 December 2021

Superseded on: 15 January 2022

Direction from Chief Health Officer in accordance with emergency powers arising from the declared public health emergency

Public Health Act 2005 (Qld)

Section 362B

On 29 January 2020, under the Public Health Act 2005, the Minister for Health and Minister for Ambulance Services made an order declaring a public health emergency in relation to coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The public health emergency area specified in the order is for ‘all of Queensland’. Its duration has been extended by regulation to 26 March 2022 and may be further extended.

Further to this declaration, l, Dr Peter Aitken, Chief Health Officer, reasonably believe it is necessary to give the following directions pursuant to the powers under s 362B of the Public Health Act 2005 to assist in containing, or to respond to, the spread of COVID-19 within the community.

Preamble

  1. This Public Health Direction replaces the Public Health Direction referred to as the Hospital Entry Direction (No.6) made on 5 November 2021 and is the successor of that Direction.

  2. This Public Health Direction is to be read in conjunction with other Public Health Directions issued under section 362B of the Public Health Act 2005 that have not expired or been revoked.

Citation

  1. This Public Health Direction may be referred to as the Hospital Entry Direction (No.7).

Revocation

  1. The Hospital Entry Direction (No.6) made on 5 November 2021 is revoked from 12:59am on 13 December 2021.

Commencement

  1. This Direction applies from 1:00am on 13 December 2021, except for Part 4A which applies from 5:00am AEST 17 December 2021, until the end of the declared public health emergency, unless it is revoked or replaced.

PART 1 – ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL HOSPITALS

  1. This part applies to all hospitals in the State of Queensland.

  2. A person, other than a patient of the hospital, must not enter, or remain at, a hospital in the State of Queensland if:

    1. the person has been diagnosed with COVID-19, unless the person is no longer subject to a direction to self-isolate under section 362B or section 362H of the Public Health Act 2005; or

    2. during the 14 days immediately preceding the entry, the person who is an international arrival arrived in Australia from a place outside Australia; or

    3. the person is unvaccinated and has been in a COVID-19 hotspot, outside of the Border Zone, in the 14 days immediately preceding the entry, or since the start date identified for the COVID-19 hotspot, whichever is shorter;

    4. the person has been to an interstate exposure venue, unless 14 days have passed since the person was at the interstate exposure venue;

      Note: a person who has been to an interstate exposure venue must quarantine as required by the Interstate Exposure Venues Direction (No. 4) or successor.

    5. during the 14 days immediately preceding the entry, or since the start date identified for the interstate area of concern (vulnerable facilities), the person has been in a place which at the time of entry is an interstate area of concern (vulnerable facilities) https://www.health.qld.gov.au/system-governance/legislation/cho-public-health-directions-under-expanded-public-health-act-powers/interstate-areas-of-concern;

    6. the person lives or works, or has lived or worked, in a Queensland COVID-19 restricted area after the identified start date, unless 14 days have passed since the person was in the Queensland COVID-19 restricted area;

    7. the person has been informed they are a close contact of a diagnosed person or a secondary contact, unless their quarantine period has ended; or

    8. the person has a temperature equal to or higher than 37.5 degrees or symptoms consistent with COVID-19; or

    9. the person has been tested for COVID-19 and has not yet received the results of that test.

  3. In addition to paragraph 7, from 5:00am AEST 17 December 2021, a person who is unvaccinated, other than a patient of the hospital, must not enter, or remain at, a hospital in the State of Queensland, unless the person is:

    1. under 16 years of age; or

    2. unable to receive a COVID-19 vaccination because of a medical contraindication and has evidence of a medical contraindication; or

    3. is a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant, and receipt of a Therapeutic Goods Administration approved COVID-19 vaccine would impact the validity of the trial. As this exemption is temporary, the medical certificate must not have expired.

    4. Note: An unvaccinated person who is permitted to enter the hospital must follow the risk mitigation measures put in place by the hospital. For example, this may require wearing a single use-surgical face mask, safely physically distancing from others or having a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of entering the facility

    5. visiting the patient of the hospital for one of the following purposes:

      1. end of life visit; or

      2. to be a support person during childbirth; or

      3. in an emergency.

    6. Note: For example, a person other than a patient of the hospital, may enter in circumstances of an emergency such as visiting a family member in ICU.

    7. a parent, carer, guardian or other responsible adult who is accompanying a child or minor that is a patient of the hospital; or

    8. Note: The unvaccinated parent, carer, guardian, or other responsible adult will need to comply with the risk mitigation measures put in place by the hospital. For example, this may require wearing a single use-surgical face mask, safely physically distancing from others or having a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of entering the facility. Only one unvaccinated parent carer, guardian or responsible adult will be allowed to accompany a child or minor to an appointment or admission at a time.

    9. a carer or support person who provides assistance or other caring responsibilities, including advocacy services, to the person who is a patient of the hospital; or

      Note: A patient of the hospital may require support from an advocate or person who has provided long-term informal support. This could include behavioural support, disability support or support due to significant health needs..

    10. is permitted to enter as an unvaccinated worker in healthcare under the Workers in a Healthcare Setting (COVID-19 Vaccination Requirements) Direction.

Exception for people entering from interstate area of concern

  1. Despite paragraph 7(e), a person may enter and remain on the premises of a hospital, if the person obtains a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in Queensland after returning from an interstate area of concern (vulnerable facilities).

Exception for people entering from a Queensland COVID-19 restricted area

  1. Despite paragraph 7(f), a person may enter and remain on the premises of a hospital, if:

    1. they are an employee or contractor of the hospital who meets the COVID-19 vaccination requirements under the Workers in a Healthcare Setting (COVID-19 Vaccination Requirements) Direction; or

    2. they are a vaccinated student; or

    3. they are a person providing goods or services that are necessary for the effective operation of the hospital, whether the goods are provided for consideration or on a voluntary basis; or

    4. they are a person providing health, medical, pathology or pharmaceutical services to a patient at the hospital, whether the goods or services are provided for consideration or on a voluntary basis;

    5. the person’s presence is required for emergency management, law enforcement or the exercise of a power or function of a government agency or entity under a law; or

    6. with the permission of the operator of the hospital, they are a person maintaining continuity of care for a patient that cannot be delivered by electronic or non-contact means; or

      Example for paragraph (e): A patient may require support from their primary care giver to eat their meals.

    7. the person's presence at the hospital is for the purposes of an end of life visit for a patient of the hospital, or for another purpose listed in paragraph 20.

  2. Despite paragraph  10, a person subject to a quarantine order, whether a formal order or advice to quarantine, issued or given by an emergency officer (public health) is not permitted to enter or remain on, the premises of a hospital in the State of Queensland.

    Example – a person who is a close contact of a diagnosed COVID-19 case who has been directed to quarantine at their home residence in a Queensland COVID-19 restricted area may not enter a hospital in Queensland.

  3. If paragraph 10 applies to a person proposing to enter a hospital, the operator of the hospital may require the person to take reasonable steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 to patients, including using appropriate personal protective equipment, providing evidence of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result obtained by the person in Queensland within the previous 72 hours, or providing evidence of having received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Exception for a person waiting for a COVID-19 test result

  1. Despite paragraph 7(i), a person may enter a hospital if the person is awaiting the result of a COVID-19 PCR test taken in accordance with a surveillance testing obligation under a Public Health Direction or Protocol approved by the Chief Health Officer.

    Note: A person awaiting COVID-19 PCR test results as part of a surveillance testing obligation must still comply with the requirements in paragraphs 7(a) to (h). For example, a person awaiting results of a routine COVID-19 PCR test required under a protocol must not enter, or remain on, the premises of a hospital if they have been overseas in the 14 days prior to entry.

Obligation on operators

  1. The operator of a hospital in the State of Queensland must take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person does not enter or remain within a hospital if the person is prohibited from doing so under this Direction.

End of life visitors (international arrivals, COVID-19 hotspots and interstate exposure venues)

  1. Despite paragraphs 7(b) to 7(e) a person may enter, or remain at, a hospital if:

    1. the person's presence at the hospital is for the purpose of an end of life visit for a patient of the hospital; and

    2. the person has been granted an exemption by the Chief Health Officer, Deputy Chief Health Officer or delegate for an end of life visit under a Public Health Direction.

    Note: For clarity, end of life visitors from an interstate area of concern who have obtained a negative COVID-19 PCR test result under paragraph 8 do not require an exemption.

  1. A person who enters a hospital under an exemption granted under paragraph 15 must comply with all conditions imposed by the Chief Health Officer, Deputy Chief Health Officer or delegate under the exemption.

  2. If a person enters a facility under paragraph 16, the operator of the hospital must manage the person’s visit in accordance with the conditions imposed by the Chief Health Officer, Deputy Chief Health Officer or delegate under the exemption.

    Example: An operator may need to ensure the patient being visited is in a single room, the visitor wears appropriate personal protective equipment, is escorted to and from the room, and avoids common areas and contact with other patients, visitors and staff.

PART 2 – MANAGING VISITOR ACCESS TO NON-RESTRICTED HOSPITALS

Visiting patients

  1. There is no limit under this Public Health Direction on the number of visitors at a non-restricted hospital.

    Note - All visitors remain subject to each hospital’s clinical guidelines for COVID-19. These clinical guidelines may be more restrictive than this direction, for example, in relation to the number and type of visitors. See paragraphs 18 and 19 for requirements for visitors to a restricted hospital.

PART 3 – MANAGING ENTRY TO RESTRICTED HOSPITALS

Visiting patients in a restricted area

  1. Subject to paragraph 20, a patient of a hospital in a restricted area may not have visitors.

  2. Subject to being fully vaccinated, the following patients of a restricted hospital may have visitors in accordance with the hospital’s clinical guidelines for COVID-19 approved by the operator of the hospital:

    1. a patient of the hospital who is a child; or

    2. a patient of the hospital being provided end of life care; or

      Note – Paragraph 15 requires particular persons to obtain an exemption before attending a hospital for an end of life visit.

    3. a patient of the hospital being provided pregnancy or maternity related care; or

    4. a patient of the hospital with a disability who requires support from a disability support worker or an informal carer; or

      Example: A person may require support from a disability support worker or person who has provided long-term informal support, such as a family member or friend.

    5. other patients that the operator of the hospital believes is necessary to have visitors for emergency or other compassionate grounds.

PART 4 – ELECTRONIC COLLECTION OF CONTACT INFORMATION

  1. The operator of a hospital must make all reasonable efforts to electronically collect contact information about all visitors to a hospital, including volunteers and contractors, at the time of entry, by either:

    1. requesting visitors use the Check In Qld app; or

    2. registering visitors through the Business Profile mode of the Check In Qld app.

      Example – a person may be unable to use the Check In Qld app due to age, disability, language barriers or does not possess the technology or own a mobile phone. The hospital must register the visitor through the Business Profile mode.

      Note – contact information must be collected for visitors to non-restricted hospitals and visitors permitted to visit restricted hospitals under paragraph 20 of the Direction.

  2. Despite paragraph 21, an operator of a hospital is not required to request a person’s contact information under paragraph 21 if:

    1. the person is entering a hospital in an emergency or entering to provide emergency services; or

    2. the person is or appears to be younger than 16 years; or

    3. it is not reasonable to request contact information based on compassionate grounds or a risk to a person’s safety.

  3. An operator of a hospital must make all reasonable efforts to clearly display the Check In Qld app QR code at each entry to the hospital that is used by visitors, including volunteers or contractors.

  4. A person who is permitted to enter a hospital under this Direction as a visitor, including volunteers and contractors, must at the time of entry provide the person’s contact information to the operator of a hospital by:

    1. using the Check In Qld App; or

    2. providing their contact details to the operator of a hospital to be registered using the Business Profile mode of the Check In Qld app; or

    3. if another method of collection is being used under paragraph 27, using that method.

  5. If a person is unable to provide contact information because of age, disability or an inability to speak or comprehend the language used by the Check In Qld App or the other method of collection, another person may provide contact information on the person’s behalf.

  6. Despite paragraph 24, a person who is permitted to enter a hospital under this Direction as a visitor, including volunteers and contractors, is not required to provide the person’s contact information to the operator of a hospital if:

    1. the person is entering a hospital in an emergency or entering to provide emergency services; or

    2. the person is under the age of 16 years old; or

    3. it is not reasonable for a person to provide contact information based on compassionate grounds or a risk to a person’s safety.

      Example – a support person accompanying a person arriving to the hospital in an ambulance in an emergency situation is not required to provide their contact information on entry to the hospital.

Collection of contact information using another method due to temporary circumstances

  1. If an operator of a hospital cannot electronically collect contact information for visitors to the hospital at the time of entry because it is not possible to use the Check In Qld app due to unexpected circumstances, or because the business is located in a place that does not have mobile internet data connection, the person must collect and keep contact information using another method.

    Example of another method – another electronic method such as a spreadsheet or another method such as a paper-based form.

    Note - unexpected circumstances may include temporary issues with failure of an internet service or breakdown in the Check In Qld app. Safety issues may include a risk of overcrowding while visitors wait to be checked in by the hospital using the Business Profile mode.

  2. If contact information is collected using ‘another method’ under paragraph 27, the operator of a hospital must:

    1. use best endeavours to transfer any non-electronic information to an electronic system within 24 hours of collecting the information; and

      Example - an electronic method such as a spreadsheet

    2. comply with the requirements for collection and storage; and

    3. if requested, provide the information collected under paragraph 25 and the electronic information under paragraph 24(c) to a public health officer within a stated time.

Part 4A COMPLIANCE WITH VACCINATION REQUIREMENTS

Obligations for persons entering into a hospital

  1. From 17 December 2021, persons who enter or remain in a hospital must, prior to entry, provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or evidence of medical contraindication or evidence of being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant.

  2. If a visitor is unable to provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or evidence of medical contraindication or evidence of being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant because of age, disability or an inability to speak or comprehend the language or technology used when requesting the proof or evidence, another person may provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or medical contraindication or evidence of being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant on the person’s behalf.

Proof of COVID-19 vaccination or medical contraindication

  1. Proof of COVID-19 vaccination or evidence of medical contraindication or evidence of being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant (printed or electronic) includes:

    1. written confirmation of COVID-19 vaccination provided to the person as part of the vaccination process, such as a record of vaccine card; or

    2. vaccination information displayed on the Check in Qld app; or

    3. a COVID-19 digital certificate or printed vaccination certificate from the Australian Immunisation Register; or

    4. an online or printed immunisation history statement for COVID-19 vaccination, including confirmation of a medical contraindication; or

      Note: A person’s immunisation history statement can be obtained from the Australian Government using myGov, the Medicare mobile app or by calling the Australian Immunisation Register and requesting a statement to be posted.

      Note: If a person is unable to receive a COVID-19 vaccination because of a recognised medical contraindication, they must provide evidence of a medical contraindication. Upon provision of evidence of a recognised medical contraindication, a person will be treated as if they are fully vaccinated.

    5. evidence of being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant;

    6. an International COVID-19 Vaccination Certificate:

      1. in a printed or electronic form from the Department of Home Affairs that confirms completion of an Australia Travel Declaration and vaccination against COVID-19 overseas; or

      2. through Medicare online account through myGov or the Express Plus Medicare mobile app; or

      3. an official record of vaccination provided to the person when vaccinated against COVID-19 overseas.

Requirements for owners and operators in relation to visitors

  1. An operator of a hospital, must make all reasonable efforts to confirm that the visitor entering and remaining on their premises meets the COVID-19 vaccination entry requirements by requesting and sighting proof of COVID-19 vaccination or evidence of medical contraindication or evidence of the visitor being a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant (printed or electronic).

  2. An operator of a hospital is not required to request a visitor’s proof of COVID-19 vaccination under paragraph 32 if:

    1. the visitor is or appears to be younger than 16 years old; or

    2. Note: Whilst a person who is 12 years or older is eligible to be fully vaccinated, proof of COVID-19 vaccination is only required for a visitor who is 16 years or older. A visitor who is under 16 years of age is eligible to attend all essential and non-essential activities.

    3. the person is exercising law enforcement, intelligence, or national security functions on behalf of a government agency; or

    4. the person enters in an emergency or is entering to provide emergency services; or

    5. it is not reasonable to collect proof of COVID-19 vaccination due to a risk to the safety of staff and other visitors.

Co-locations within hospitals

  1. If part of a hospital is not co-located and meets the requirements in paragraph 35, a person engaged or employed to undertake work in that part of the hospital is not subject to COVID-19 vaccination requirements.

  2. For paragraph 34 to apply, the part of a hospital must:

    1. be unoccupied by users and workers of the hospital; and

    2. be physically separate from the occupied part of the hospital or be secured and delineated so that users and visitors of the hospital cannot enter; and

    3. not have shared points of access with the users and visitors of the hospital; and

    4. not be accessed by a person who uses the facilities (for example, toilets or lunchroom) in the hospital.

      Example: Construction workers on a free standing building not connected to an occupied part of the hospital (new build or refurbishment) or installation of a modular building at a hospital would not be required to be vaccinated if they are separate and do not enter the occupied part of the hospital.

  3. In addition to paragraph 35, if a person engaged or employed to undertake work in that part of the hospital enters the occupied hospital, the person must comply with the visitor requirements.

Emergency entry

  1. An unvaccinated worker may enter a high-risk setting for any of the following purposes, and paragraphs 7 and 8 do not apply:

    1. to respond to an emergency or provide an emergency service; or

    2. to undertake a legislated regulatory or compliance function; or

    3. as part of official union duties in response to an emergent need.

      Examples: a contractor, who is not vaccinated, enters a hospital to fix a flooding in the toilet block.

      There is a salmonella outbreak at a hospital and an environmental health officer may investigate the facility, regardless of whether the person meets the COVID-19 vaccination requirements or is unvaccinated.

  2. An unvaccinated person must advise the operator of the hospital of the entry under paragraph 37 and of their vaccination status as soon as is reasonably practicable. Use of the Check In Qld app will satisfy the requirements of this paragraph.

PART 5 – MANAGING STUDENT ACCESS TO HOSPITALS

  1. From 11 November 2021, a student must not enter, or remain on, the premises of a hospital for the purpose of a placement in connection with an enrolled course of study, unless they are fully vaccinated.

  2. A vaccinated student mentioned in this Part or in paragraph 10 must provide evidence of having received the prescribed number of doses of their COVID-19 vaccination if requested by the operator of a hospital, or their nominated representative.

    Note: A vaccinated student can provide evidence of vaccination in their immunisation history statement from the Australian Immunisation Register. A vaccinated student can obtain their immunisation history statement from the Australian Government using myGov, the Medicare mobile app or by calling the Australian Immunisation Register and requesting a statement to be posted. Information is available at: https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/australian-immunisation-register/how-get-immunisation-history-statement.

PART 6 - EXEMPTIONS

  1. The Chief Health Officer may, in writing, grant an exemption from this direction in respect of a specified area of a hospital if the Chief Health Officer is satisfied, having regard to the need to limit the spread of COVID-19, that an exemption is appropriate due to:

    1. the nature of the area; or

    2. the existing limits on the number of people that may be present in the area (whether because of the operation of a direction under the Public Health Act 2005 or otherwise).

PART 7 – OTHER MATTERS

  1. A person is taken not to have been in a COVID-19 hotspot under this Direction if the person complies with the transit exceptions in paragraph 6 of the Border Restrictions Direction (No. 55) or its successor.

    Note: under the Border Restrictions Direction a person is taken not to have been in a COVID-19 hotspot if they

    1. arrived in a COVID-19 hotspot by air for the sole purpose of transiting through an approved airport in the COVID-19 hotspot and did not leave the confines of the airport; or

    2. Note: A person who arrives at an international airport in a COVID-19 hotspot who immediately transits to a domestic terminal without otherwise leaving the confines of the airport is taken not to have been in a COVID-19 hotspot for the purposes of entry restrictions and quarantine requirements.

    3. transited through a COVID-19 hotspot by road using private transport for a distance of no more than two hours of safe driving distance from their point of entry to a COVID-19 hotspot, without stopping; or

    4. arrived in a COVID-19 hotspot by road and used private transport to travel directly without stopping, to an airport in a COVID-19 hotspot within two hours of safe driving distance from their point of entry into the COVID-19 hotspot, to depart the COVID-19 hotspot by air.

  2. Definitions used in this Direction are in Schedule 1.

PART 8 – PENALTIES

A person to whom the direction applies commits an offence if the person fails, without reasonable excuse, to comply with the direction.

Section 362D of the Public Health Act 2005 provides:

Failure to comply with public health directions

A person to whom a public health direction applies must comply with the direction unless the person has a reasonable excuse.
Maximum penalty—100 penalty units or 6 months imprisonment.

Dr Peter Aitken
Chief Health Officer

11 December 2021

Published on the Queensland Health website at 2:50 pm

SCHEDULE 1 – DEFINITIONS

For the purposes of this Direction:

Australia means the Commonwealth of Australia and includes the external territories of Norfolk Island, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Coral Sea Islands and Heard and McDonald Islands but excludes the Australian Antarctic Territory.

Border zone has the same meaning as in the Border Restrictions Direction (No.55) or its successors.

Business Profile mode means the ability for businesses to electronically register by entering customer contact details via ‘Check In Qld Business Profile mode’ listed in the profile section of the app.

Check In Qld app means the app developed by the Queensland Government for contact tracing purposes which, when used by a person, provides the Queensland Government with the person’s contact information and details of the person’s attendance at a hospital.

Note – Each person should check in individually using the Check In Qld app or have a person in their group or the hospital check in on their behalf.

Close contact has the same meaning as in the Management of Close Contacts Direction (No. 2) or its successor.

Co-located means using shared facilities and staff, patients and visitors of the hospital move freely between the co-located functions or settings.

Example: part of a hospital’s grounds are fenced off while construction of a carpark is undertaken. While the construction work progresses, hospital staff and patients are excluded from the construction site and the construction company has control of the site. The construction site is not co-located with the hospital and is not subject to the COVID-19 vaccination requirements that apply to staff and visitors to the hospital.

Contact information means the information collected by the Check in Qld app or, if another collection method is permitted under this Direction, the name, phone number, email address, and the date and time of attendance of visitors and staff.

Contractor means an individual who provides construction, repair, or maintenance services on an unscheduled or intermittent basis. A contractor does not include a visiting medical practitioner or health practitioners providing health services on the hospital premises.
Examples: repairing or maintaining a lift or providing plumbing services to repair a broken toilet.

COVID-19 hotspot means a particular area of Australia decided by the Chief Health Officer and published on the Queensland Health website.

COVID-19 PCR test means for a person who is:

  1. 12 months of age or over, an oropharyngeal and deep nasal swab of a person who is 12 months of age or over, for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test approved for use in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration to detect whether a person has the COVID-19 virus.

  2. under 12 months of age, a saliva swab for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test approved for use in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration to detect whether a person has the COVID-19 virus.

    Note: A COVID-19 PCR test does not include a self-test.

COVID-19 vaccination means a COVID-19 vaccine approved for use in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration or endorsed by WHO-COVAX and the vaccine was obtained overseas.

COVID-19 vaccine means a COVID-19 vaccine approved for use in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration or endorsed by WHO-COVAX and the vaccine was obtained overseas

COVID-19 vaccine trial means a medical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine under either the Clinical Trial Notification or Clinical Trial Approval schemes regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

COVID-19 vaccine trial participant means a person who:

  1. is an active participant in a COVID-19 vaccine trial; and

  2. provides a medical certificate or letter from a medical practitioner, registered under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (Queensland) associated with the COVID-19 vaccine trial confirming that:

    1. the person is participating in a Phase 3 or 4 COVID-19 vaccine trial; and

    2. the person  has received at least one active dose of the COVID-19 vaccine being trialled.

Diagnosed person has the same meaning as in the Management of Close Contacts Direction (No. 3) or its successor.

Eligible health professionals means any of the following:

  • fellows of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (as defined by the Health Insurance Act 1973 Cth); or

  • fellows of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (as defined by the Health Insurance Act 1973 Cth); or

  • on Medicare’s Vocation Register of General Practitioners (as defined by the Health Insurance Act 1973 Cth); or

  • practice registrar on an approved 3GA training placement; or

  • paediatrician; or

  • public health physician; or

  • infectious diseases physician; or

  • clinical immunologist.

Emergency officer (public health) means an emergency officer appointed under the Public Health Act 2005.
Note: Emergency officers appointed under the Public Health Act 2005 include public health officers and police.

Emergency services means staff who respond to and deal with emergencies when they occur, such as ambulance service, police and the fire brigade.

End of life visit means a hospital visit by a person for the purposes of end-of-life support for a patient of the hospital.

Exposure date for an impacted area means the date, if any, specified in the Restrictions for Impacted Areas (No. 17) (SEQ restrictions Direction or its successors.

Fully vaccinated means a person who is 16 years of age or over has received the prescribed number of doses of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Note: Information about the World Health Organization COVAX program and WHO emergency use listing is available here: WHO COVID-19 vaccines.

Note: a person who has evidence of a medical contraindication is treated as being fully vaccinated

Hospital means:

  1. a hospital, as defined in schedule 2 to the Hospital and Health Boards Act 2011; or

  2. a private health facility, as defined in section 8 of the Private Health Facilities Act 1999; or

  3. a multi-purpose service, as defined in section 104 of the Subsidy Principles 2014 made under section 96-1 of the Aged Care Act 1997 (Cth).

Identified start date for a Queensland COVID-19 restricted area can be found in the Queensland COVID-19 Restricted Areas Direction (No.30), or its successor.

Immunisation history statement means a statement that displays all the immunisations a person has had that are on the Australian Immunisation Register.

Note: further information can be found on https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/australian-immunisation-register

International arrival means a person who arrives in Queensland on a flight that is not a quarantine-free flight or who, in the 14 days immediately before their arrival to Queensland -

  1. has been in a place outside Australia, other than a safe travel zone country; or

  2. arrived in Australia by sea; or

  3. arrived in Australia by air on a flight that is not a quarantine-free flight, regardless of whether the flight originated from a safe travel zone country; or

  4. has been in a place declared a safe travel zone country hotspot.

Interstate area of concern means a particular area of Australia decided by the Chief Health Officer and published on the Queensland Government website [include link] for the purpose of restricting visitors to vulnerable facilities including residential aged care, shared disability accommodation services and hospitals.

Interstate exposure venue has the same meaning as in the Interstate Exposure Venues Direction (No. 3) or its successor.

Medical contraindication means a person has a current:

  1. COVID-19 vaccine medical exemption recorded on the Australian Immunisation Register or

  2. Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) immunisation medical exemptions form completed and signed by an eligible health professional for the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Notes: some medical contraindications are temporary and therefore the record or completed form may only be valid for a period of time.

    A current completed and signed AIR immunisation medical exemption form is valid in printed or digital form.

Nominated representative of an operator of a hospital is the person identified by the operator as their delegate for the purposes of this Direction.

Non-restricted hospital means a hospital, other than a restricted hospital.

Operator of a hospital means a person who owns, controls or operates the hospital.

Example: The Chief Executive, Chief Operating Officer or Executive Director of a hospital.

Patient of the hospital means a person who requests or is being provided with health, medical or pharmaceutical services by the hospital.

Proof of COVID-19 vaccination means evidence provided as outlined in Part 2 that verifies a person is fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Note: a person who provides evidence of a medical contraindication or is a COVID-19 vaccine trial participant is treated as if they are fully vaccinated.

Queensland COVID-19 restricted area and restricted area means a Local Government Area identified in the Queensland COVID-19 Restricted Areas Direction (No.30), or its successors.

Quarantine-free flight means a flight that only carries passengers who have declared that in the 14 days prior to the flight’s departure they have only been in a safe travel zone country and have not been in a safe travel zone country hotspot.

Note: Information about quarantine free flights is available from the Australian Department of Home Affairs: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/new-zealand-safe-travel-zone

Restricted area means a Local Government Area identified in the Queensland COVID-19 Restricted Areas Direction (No.30), or its successors.

Restricted hospital means a hospital located in a restricted area.

Safe travel zone country has the same meaning as in the Quarantine for International Arrivals Direction (No. 12), or its successor.

Safe travel zone country hotspot has the same meaning as in the Quarantine for International Arrivals Direction (No. 12), or its successor.

Secondary contact means:

  1. a person who ordinarily resides in the same residence as a close contact and has resided in the residence since the time when the close contact event occurred; and

  2. a category of person approved by the Chief Health Officer and specified on the Queensland Health Contact tracing (exposure sites) — coronavirus (COVID-19) webpage.

Student means a student who:

  1. in connection with an enrolled course of study, is undertaking a placement under the supervision of an employee or contractor at the hospital; or

  2. is entering the hospital as part of a placement in connection with an enrolled course of study.

    Example for paragraph (b): a paramedical student.

Support person means a spouse, family member, friend or carer that is that is providing support to the patient.

Surveillance testing obligation means a requirement under a Public Health Direction or Protocol approved by the Chief Health Officer for a person to be routinely tested for COVID-19, who does not have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and is not required to self-isolate while awaiting a test result unless there is another lawful reason for them to isolate.

Symptoms consistent with COVID-19 means fever or history of fever, symptoms of acute respiratory infection (cough, shortness of breath, sore throat), loss of smell, loss of taste, runny nose, diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting or fatigue.

Unvaccinated means the person has not received the prescribed number of doses of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Vaccinated Student means a student who has received the prescribed number of doses of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Last updated: 15 January 2022